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Posts Tagged ‘Conveyancing’


The Challenges of DIY Conveyancing Process | Monday, July 23rd, 2012

A lot of people are trying to save on their expenditure by trying to perform all the simple tasks at home and at work by themselves without including professionals; the conveyancing field is neither an exception with a huge number of people trying out their luck with DIY conveyancing. When one is engaging in the DIY conveyancing, there is a number of conditioned that need to be met by the involved parties to make sure that it’s successful. One might save some cash in the process, but the struggles in the DIY conveyancing process do deter others such much so that they hire professionals to do that task.

When one is getting involved in the DIY conveyancing there are a number of aspects that one needs to come to terms with. The first one is that the method of property conveyancing is labour intensive. When one decides that the DIY conveyancing is the best suited method for their property purchase, one needs to come to terms with the fact that most of the work will be done by the individual DIY solicitor. The work will range from research to legal terms and conditions between firms and organisations in a region and in the event that one has no idea on housing conditions it will be tough.

When it comes to financial rewards the DIY conveyancing method of conducting your conveyancing is the least rewarding. A combination of being new in the field and the lack of experience of the individual conducting the exchange is not quite as effective as a commonly known firm or company that deals with such type of clients on a daily basis. As a DIY conveyancing solicitor, it is also quite hard to know the market that one is looking to invest in as your knowledge and expertise in the field is so limited to what you learn whilst on the job.

Although the whole decision to engage in DIY conveyancing process may be based on trying to save money by not hiring professional conveyancing solicitors, the whole process could end up being just as expensive as engaging a professional to do the work. Costs such as the amount of fuel, papers and accessories that are used to complete a successful DIY conveyancing transaction usually take up most of what could have been paid to the experts for a great job. Incurred costs might be far greater than those of well chosen online conveyancing firm that can usually provide a fixed fee conveyancing quote.

Since the DIY route is mostly labour intensive, it has the tendency to be very time consuming. Usually a conveyancing process takes week to be completed whereas these weeks could be spent earning cash via your own employment.  When it comes to the success of conveyancing, the DIY conveyancing process is the most risky in financial and result terms. One can easily miss an important issue regarding the conveyancing process whereas a local conveyancing solicitor knows the local property and its building constraints and the conveyancing law of his jurisdiction .

What You Should Know About Conveyancing? | Friday, July 13th, 2012

Before moving in to start buying or selling any property, you will have to know a few important facts about property conveyancing. Conveyancing is a legally binding process  that approves transfer of ownership from one seller to different buyer a process usually done by a licensed conveyancer or a conveyancing solicitor. Although you can do it using DIY conveyancing process, the complications and legal issues that may arise are far too risky and thus it’s advisable to use a conveyancing expert. To help you understand the whole process even better, here are a few facts to help you know why you will need a property solicitor.

When selling your property or in need of downsizing your current home, a property solicitor will very much be useful. When relocating and you are in urgent need to sell your business or house, and when you decide to buy your own house and when you are expanding your investment through buying of new property, then you will need the skills of a reliable conveyancing solicitor to help you through the whole legal frame work involved. If the transaction involves a chain of buyers and sellers then people will want to buy and sell at the same time and this is characterised by a lot of tedious and stressful paper work and processes for all case handlers. To have both these conveyancing transactions go through is a lot more involving and therefore you will definitely need reliable conveyancing solicitor to help you out.

The work required in property conveyancing is very involving but in a nut shell it involves the following; to help you in the process of selling your property by offering services such as preparing contracts such as certificates, and submitting them to agents and clients. Organise settlements on property owner’s behalf and negotiate with the prospects and if all goes well complete the whole sales process. On the other hand, when purchasing a property, a solicitor will help you understand the contract in simple English, negotiate for any amendments, discuss any reports about the property with you, exchange contracts and explain mortgage documentation. Finally he will organise settlement on your behalf.

It is possible to have a smooth property transfer procedure that is hassle free and less complicated. Choose a conveyancing specialist who are skilled and are well conversant with all aspects of property law. This way you will be rest assured in having value for your money and that nothing will hopefully go wrong. Experienced and competent conveyancing solicitors mean that you have picked a representative who is covered by professional indemnity insurance thereby you are relaxed and can trust their work. Your property solicitor should be very customer oriented and provide you with all adequate advice and guidance on any arising issues.

Communicating is very important during the transfer period and you will without doubt need to be in constant communication with your choice solicitor. Pricing should as well be considered while choosing a legal representative. Don’t substitute price for quality but at the same time you also have to save money. Having credible references will help you choose a company with good track history. With this information on your finger tips, you will not make any mistakes when it comes to selecting conveyancing experts.

Conveyancing Services and Hidden Fees | Sunday, April 15th, 2012

There are many conveyancing services, each offering a different pricing and price package for the work of conveyancing.  To make sure your property title is clear and has no legal lien or judgments against it, the process of researching and surveying can easily be a costly one, but it doesn’t have to be.

Basic Fee Structure for Conveyancing

A straightforward conveyancing service package will include checking of public records and court house documents to see if the land title has any problems or if it is clear to be sold.  There are two basic fee structures: either a flat fee for the work or you could be charged on a per hour basis.  If you find a firm that will do the work for a flat fee, always find out what the fee includes – do not assume that the fees include all court document filing fees, photocopying fees, and postage fees.  Often time those charges are not included and can really add up in the end.

Hidden Fees

Ask specifically if what you are paying for includes the following charges:

  • Postage office charges and fees.  It may seem a like a small detail, but these charges can and do add up quickly.
  • Copy Fees.  Ask if you will be charged for any copies you request or that are needed in the process of conveyancing.  If you will be charged for any copies, ask what the rate is per copy.  For each page of the document, and since many reports are several pages long, this could be quite costly.
  • Court Fees.  If the courts charge for filing any documents or for the photocopying of any documents, find out if your package will cover these costs or if these charges are passed along to you separately.  This can really pad the bill that you will be receiving.
  • Mortgage Transaction Costs.  Will you be charged additionally for this or does the firm handling the conveyance cover these charges for you?

Conveyancing can be an expensive process depending on the firm that is handling your conveyancing, but it doesn’t have to break the bank.  There are many solicitors and private conveyancing services companies with comprehensive service packages, it just takes a little looking around to find the right fit.  When you meet with or call any a conveyancing service, have your list of questions ready and do not sign any contract or hire the agency or firm without making sure you know what their service does and, more importantly, doesn’t include.

Being on your way to purchasing or sell a property is an exciting proposition, especially for first time home buyers, but always be aware of what it takes to make a good decision in this important process.  Another question to ask when speaking with a prospective conveyancing firm is to find out if they handle all your work within their office or if they hire out the work to other firms.  This is crucial as they are dealing with sensitive and private information, and your confidentiality and privacy should be a top priority not only for you but for the conveyancing services firm you work with.

What is The NewBuy Scheme and will it work? | Sunday, April 1st, 2012

There has been a lot of talk amongst local and online conveyancing firms as well as the wider public, about the governments latest attempts to kick-start the struggling housing market, the NewBuy scheme. Even with lower purchase costs thanks to the growth of online conveyancing, the credit crunch has hit the housing market hard and with wide-spread redundancies and harder economic times, the UK has seen a huge increase in the number of people defaulting on the mortgage. The banks natural reaction to this was to stop lending and the online conveyancing companies that only recently set-up found themselves without clients, with banks often requiring a deposit of as much as 30-40%.

 

As any well informed online conveyancing solicitor will tell you, the average house price in the UK is over £200,000 so the banks high deposit requirements meant that even with the cheap online conveyancing services making it easier than ever, only those with large amounts of available capital were able to get a mortgage. This has contributed to online conveyancing solicitors driving down costs, knowing that even those who would normally be keen to use a local firm could be tempted to use their online conveyancing service in such difficult times. But with hundreds of new build houses lying vacant and construction companies halting projects (and subsequently laying off staff) until the existing properties are sold, the government have stepped in to try and encourage the banks to start lending more leniently.

 

You may have seen in the news or through online conveyancing sites, the governments solution to this problem is the NewBuy scheme. The NewBuy scheme involves a loan guarantee to encourage the major banks to start offering mortgages again on new build properties, with a much lower deposit level – in this case as little as 5%. Under the rules of the new scheme, property developers who have these empty properties will pay the lender 3.5% of the purchase price of the property whilst the government will put up a further 5.5% as a guarantee – but will only pay out this amount should there be a further drop in house prices. This means the banks  they can now afford to give out much larger mortgages with a much lower level of risk, as they can rest assured that should the property need to be repossessed, they would not lose money.

 

Critics have suggested that in reality this isn’t a scheme to help potential homeowners but rather the developers who have so many empty properties. Whichever way you look at it, this hasn’t helped the online conveyancing solicitors who had launched their online conveyancing platforms shortly before the recession, as many developers will have their own local law firm deal with the process rather than allowing homebuyers to choose their own local or online conveyancing solicitors. These online conveyancing firms have however seen improved figures, with many customers turning against the traditional solicitors and choosing cheaper online conveyancing solicitors. As online conveyancing firms are generally cheaper than local ones and the economic crisis hitting homebuyers hard, online conveyancing solicitors have become a popular alternative.

The Property Owner in Conveyancing | Friday, March 23rd, 2012

Conveyancing is a process that involves a number of parties that include the buyer, seller, solicitor and witnesses. The individuals that are involved in the housing businesses have to meet certain personal and functional requirements in the transfer of ownership of property. There are a number of reasons that might influence the sale of a given property and in each case the factors in regards to the sale are different. In the property field, there are several investment opportunities that might arise in a given location thus leading to development of the acquired land.

Conveyancing can have the terms determined by the owner of the property since they have lots to determine the sale of the property. In most cases people usually associate the seller with setting the price of the property, but there is a lot more that is involved in the conveyancing on part of the buyer. The seller is a very important participant in the conveyancing process and the deals that are involved in the process. The initial and mid stages of the conveyance usually rely on the  property owner quite a lot since it involves the double checking of documents that are presented in the process of marketing and research on the property.

The relation between the seller and the local housing authorities, the local councils, the contractor as well as their financial agent had lots of say on the sale of the real estate property. There is a huge number of individuals that sell their property due reasons such as a failing mortgage or an unmanageable debt. Knowing the conditions that surround the property in form of debts and taxes should be quite helpful in a conveyance deal since it allows the buyer and seller to settle on a deal that is mutually beneficial. Property that has lots of debts attached to it might not be the best real estate investment to acquire but the solicitor should look through the condition of the property before deeming it bad for purchase.

Cheap house deals can be gotten from a number of sources such as the reclaimed houses. There is a lot that has happened over the years in acquisition of the real estate property with a huge number of people looking to sell their property to make sure that they do not soil their credit records with their banks. Conveyancing solicitors will help one in showing the history of ownership of the house and thus help in knowing the financial condition of the property to acquire.

Another reason why it’s possible to find cheap real estate property is the condition of the house. Usually as a house or any other product ages, the more value it loses and thus this leads to a lower price on reselling the property. In housing, if the conveyancing deal involves a deplorable property, then the cost that is paid to the owner is quite low based on the fact that repairs. The solicitor should account for this in advising their client when engaging in the conveyance.

What is Conveyancing? | Saturday, July 17th, 2010

Conveyancing is designed to protect both parties (although it is most beneficial to the buyer or receiver of the title) in the event of a transaction relevant to the exchange of a land title. It can be a drawn out process that ensures that the buyer has the right to sell the title to the land and that there is nothing to suggest that the land is acceptable for resale at the behest of the buyer. It is also a formality for banks or lenders in the event the land is to be bought via a mortgage or long term loan. This ensures that if the person borrowing the money neglects to pay the money back – the banks have some option in regard to reselling the property to get their money back.

Other important reasons for conveyancing includes drawing up the relevant contracts for the buyer and seller that stipulate the terms of the sale. This is to ensure that the buyer is given the right to do with the land what they wish. If no agreement is made during this process it gives the buyer and the seller the opportunity to back out of the deal before anything is signed. The conveyancing process is a necessity in that it ensures a transparent means of equity transferral. Because purchasing land is a major expenditure on the part of the buyer, there needs to be a system in place that records all of the details of the exchange in order to allow the buyer and seller come to an adequate understanding as it applies to the deed of sale.

Conveyancing is also relevant in regards to the transferral of any mortgages or monies owed on the property that is being sold. As conveyancing is more akin to facilitating the transfer of equity from one person to another, a person may opt to take over the mortgage or loan repayments on the property if they are still outstanding. Because of the large time frame in which the process is undertaken and the many variables involved in the undertaking of the process, it is not a simple task. This is compounded by any outstanding loans of mortgages on the property as it will require a bank to sign off on the transfer of the loans. It is important that people who require this form of transfer deal with a buyer that has a clean credit history in order for the bank to allow the process to continue.

Solicitor versus Conveyancer for the Purposes of Conveyancing | Saturday, July 17th, 2010

There is not a lot of difference between a licensed conveyancer and solicitor. However, the minor differences can help you make an informed decision about whom you wish to use in regards to any conveyancing work you need done. The first thing to consider is price. Again, there may not be a great difference in what each charge. However, a solicitor is more likely to charge you a regular hourly rate as a solicitor – unless the solicitor specialises in conveyancing, then they may charge flat fees. A licensed conveyancer is more likely to charge you a flat fee then a little extra for getting the contracts finalised. The flat fee is sometimes relevant to how much the property is selling for or how much equity is being transferred in the conveyancing process.

A solicitor may have a broader understanding of specific legalities that apply in a broader sense. This can be useful in the sense that they can help you avoid legal pitfalls that are not specifically applicable to the conveyancing process. A licensed conveyancer will know all of the ins and outs of the conveyancing process and may have a better grasp of the legalities as they are applicable to conveyancing regulations. In this regard, both have their strengths and weaknesses. Although they are both probably adept at fulfilling the requirements of a conveyancer; one may be more specialised in the other. However, the other may not have a good understanding of external legalities that can apply to the process.

If you are selling a property or transferring equity as part of a business venture then you may be more inclined to use a solicitor that you have already working for your company. Although that is not to say that you can’t get advice from another source. Having a licensed conveyancer work hand in hand with a solicitor can yield excellent results. It will also ensure that if one or the other can’t fulfil a specific obligation within a certain time frame then the other can pick up the slack. This can help push the conveyancing process through a lot quicker. Although, you are still at the whim of the other parties that are required to process the paperwork so it may not be a huge advantage in this sense. Shop around, get some references if need be. There is no dearth in the amount of conveyancing experts out there.

Getting Cheap Conveyancing Quotes | Saturday, July 17th, 2010

Conveyancing fees can differ dramatically from solicitor to solicitor. Some will even charge you a percentage of the value of the property – which is ludicrous. That is why you should always shop around when you require the services of someone who can do your conveyancing for you. Licensed conveyancers can be a little cheaper but the price you are likely to pay for conveyancing services will be around the same price as that of a solicitor. That is why it is always advisable to get quotes from people who offer conveyancing services to ensure you are getting the right price. You will also want to ensure you get a flat fee instead of getting charged every step along the way during the conveyancing process. Many conveyancers will charge you for just signing a contract – however, it is worth noting that they are the people who are preparing the contract you are signing.

There are so many conveyancers out there that it may seem overwhelming at first. Start with a few conveyancers. Because there are so many conveyancers out there the market is quite competitive. Conveyancing has become a massive industry unto itself. So finding the right person for the job may be easier than you think. If you can’t find a reasonable price at first, keep looking. You will find someone eventually. It is just a matter of knowing what to look for when searching for the right price. You will probably see some dramatic differences in fee structures. Only after seeing how their fee structures work will you be able to accurately gauge what a reasonable price is. You may opt to pay a little more if the conveyancer is highly regarded. However, someone who is fresh to the industry may really know their stuff and will charge a little less in order to build a client base.

Never take the first quote as the best you will find. It may even help to play conveyancers against each other in order to get the best deal. Ensure you know what fees you are likely to incur and get something in writing. It may also help to get other conveyancers to look at other quotes you have received in order to see if they can match the price of another firm. Conveyancing is something every property buyer and seller has to go through in order to sell or purchase a property.

Do It Yourself Conveyancing | Saturday, July 17th, 2010

If you have managed to find a buyer (or managed to find a property you wish to buy) you are going to have to go through the conveyancing motions in order to finalise the sale. Conveyancing is a complicated and time consuming process. If you opt to do it yourself then you will have to arm yourself with the knowledge to do it properly. You will also have to deal with many other people (including the buyer or seller – or their solicitor) to ensure that the process is transparent and done to the correct legal standard. You may also have to deal with a mortgage broker, lender or bank in order to successfully complete the paperwork. A lot of the time anyone who is responsible for lending money will not deal with someone who wants to do their own conveyancing.

The main advantage when doing your own conveyancing comes from the amount of money you can save. Although it may seem like a relatively small amount in the grand scheme of things; it is money that is better in your pocket than theirs. You also have an element of control over the sale – more so than you would otherwise. You are able to get the information to the parties that require it quicker than waiting. However, this in itself can be a draw back in that you do not get any guidance regarding when to do what. Conveyancing is fickle territory. As previously stated, a bank may be unwilling to deal with someone who is not covered by professional liability insurance if any problems arise during the conveyancing process. Although you can hire someone to represent you in order to approach lenders for you, it might be cheaper in general to have someone help you through the whole process.

Whilst you do not have to be a licensed solicitor in order to successfully undertake the conveyancing process for any property you wish to buy or sell; the cost of your time may be quite high if you wish to do it yourself. It may end up cheaper hiring someone to do it for you. If you factor in the value of what your time is actually worth – it can end up costing you more in the long run. Although, that is not to say that it is a bad idea to do it yourself. It is worth approaching a professional in order to find out what it is likely to cost before attempting to do it yourself.

Do I Need Conveyancing? | Saturday, July 17th, 2010

Do you need conveyancing when selling a property or transferring equitable property? The short answer is yes. After all is said and done during the conveyancing process comes the time to exchange contracts and title deeds and that is when the ownership is conferred to the new owner. Prior to this (and after) is the conveyancing process. This is when everyone who is required to be involved with the process comes together and signs a bunch of forms and confirms that the property is able to be exchanged. Without this process there is no guarantee for the buyer (or seller) that the transaction is actually allowed or able to take place. There are various options in regards to fulfilling the requirements that are required during the process – this is another article entirely – however, the main thing to remember is that the process in general is required of you and all other parties that are involved in some way with the property.

A prime example of why this process is required is if you consider the financial backing for the transaction which may come from a mortgage broker, lender or bank. If the lender can’t be assured of the value of the property, the buyer’s intention to fulfil contractual requirements that stipulate the repayment of funds and a guarantee on their investment then they can hardly be blamed when they refuse to take the risk associated with lending hundreds of thousands of pounds. It is also a security measure for the buyer. If the property is not actually owned by the seller then the title deed they are eventually awarded is void. They have not actually bought the property – they just have a worthless piece of paper.

While conveyancing may seem like a total waste of time and money from the perspective of the seller – that is far from the truth. It is actually just as important for the seller as it ensures that they will end up receiving the money they have been offered for their property. It is also important in regards to the legal exchange of a large amount of money for property. It can be argued that the same conveyancing process would be useful for any large purchase. However, it is not the case because property itself is an equitable asset. It may also be important for divorcees to utilise this process in order to distribute the equitable assets accordingly during the divorce proceedings.